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SAT

The SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. Introduced in 1926, its name and scoring have changed several times; originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test, it was later called the Scholastic Assessment Test, then the SAT I: Reasoning Test, then the SAT Reasoning Test, then, simply the SAT and now the New SAT.

The SAT is owned, developed, and published by the College Board, a private, not-for-profit corporation in the United States. The test is intended to assess students’ readiness for college. The SAT was originally designed not to be aligned with high school curricula, but several adjustments have been made for the version of the SAT introduced in 2016, and College Board president, David Coleman, has said that he also wanted to make the test reflect more closely what students learned in high school.

Two main sections of the SAT are: reading/writing and math. Each of these sections is scored out of 800, and they are added together to get your overall score. The essay is optional in the redesigned SAT and will not be factored into your overall SAT score. The essay scores will be shown separately on the report. If you choose to write an essay, it will be scored on three measures: Reading, Analysis and Writing (a good way to remember it: RAW). One can receive a score of 2 to 8 in each of these areas.